Australian
Heritage

 

Australian Heritage celebrates Australia's history and heritage, and encourages everyone to share their interest in the diverse culture, landscape and traditions of our great island continent.

You will find a feast of articles on an ever-increasing range of topics and themes, as well as an enormous amount of information on our historic places, events, news and book releases. Please enjoy and participate in this special forum dedicated to Australia's dynamic and colourful heritage.

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Heritage Towns of Australia


By clicking on a state or territory on the map, you can access a guide to Australia's historic towns, including a wealth of information about local history, heritage buildings, museums and places of interest.

We invite organisations to submit information for inclusion on this site. Please click here to email your information to the Directory Editor.

 

Search for town

 

Heritage Towns of Australia

Tasmania Victoria New South Wales South Australia Queensland Northern Territory Western Australia ACT


By clicking on a state or territory on the map, you can access a guide to Australia's historic towns, including a wealth of information about local history, heritage buildings, museums and places of interest.

We invite organisations to submit information for inclusion on this site. Please click here to email your information to the Directory Editor.

 

Search for town

 

For the First Australians, the invasion by Europeans meant total disruption of their lives and alienation from the land that had sustained them for thousands of years. In Victoria, the Wurundjeri people of the Yarra Valley were allotted and settled on a small piece of land called Coranderrk, but despite a valiant stuggle led by head man, William Barak, they were once again denied the right to call it their own.

By Bruce Pascoe


Just over 200 years ago, on 11 September 1803, a rag-tag collection of 49 soldiers, settlers and convicts arrived at Risdon Cove on the River Derwent. In command was 18-year-old Navy Lieutenant John Bowen, with orders to take possession of the island and prevent a rumoured French settlement there. From these uncertain beginnings, the city of Hobart was to be born.

by Phillip Tardiff

 

The treacherous waters at the entrance to Port Phillip Bay are amongst the most dangerous in the world, and more than 700 vessels have met their end at the entrance and within the bay. Since 1839, it has been the responsibility of the Port Phillip Sea Pilots to steer ships safely through the labyrinth of rips, reefs and unpredictable tidal currents as they enter and leave the bay.

By Matthew Stirling

 

Not many merchant bankers today disappear, and when they do, it is seldom because they are thought to have been eaten by cannibals. For a century, Benjamin Boyd’s greatest claim to fame was his mysterious disappearance at Guadalcanal, in the Solomon Islands, in 1851. For a decade before that, however, Ben Boyd carved an erratic, distinctive path through colonial society and through the New South Wales economy. Today, he is remembered through a collection of ruins and buildings south of Eden on the New South Wales border, all that remains of his private town, Boydtown.

By Marion Diamond

 

For the First Australians, the invasion by Europeans meant total disruption of their lives and alienation from the land that had sustained them for thousands of years. In Victoria, the Wurundjeri people of the Yarra Valley were allotted and settled on a small piece of land called Coranderrk, but despite a valiant stuggle led by head man, William Barak, they were once again denied the right to call it their own.

By Bruce Pascoe


Just over 200 years ago, on 11 September 1803, a rag-tag collection of 49 soldiers, settlers and convicts arrived at Risdon Cove on the River Derwent. In command was 18-year-old Navy Lieutenant John Bowen, with orders to take possession of the island and prevent a rumoured French settlement there. From these uncertain beginnings, the city of Hobart was to be born.

by Phillip Tardiff

 

The treacherous waters at the entrance to Port Phillip Bay are amongst the most dangerous in the world, and more than 700 vessels have met their end at the entrance and within the bay. Since 1839, it has been the responsibility of the Port Phillip Sea Pilots to steer ships safely through the labyrinth of rips, reefs and unpredictable tidal currents as they enter and leave the bay.

By Matthew Stirling

 

Not many merchant bankers today disappear, and when they do, it is seldom because they are thought to have been eaten by cannibals. For a century, Benjamin Boyd’s greatest claim to fame was his mysterious disappearance at Guadalcanal, in the Solomon Islands, in 1851. For a decade before that, however, Ben Boyd carved an erratic, distinctive path through colonial society and through the New South Wales economy. Today, he is remembered through a collection of ruins and buildings south of Eden on the New South Wales border, all that remains of his private town, Boydtown.

By Marion Diamond

 

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